Charles Sturt University
Charles Sturt University

Dr Alexandra Knight

Dr Alexandra Knight

PhD CSU, M Env Man UNE, Grad Dip Env Stud (Hons) UTAS, BA USYD

Dr Alexandra Knight is an ecologist and social researcher with the School of Environmental Studies.  Her ecological research focuses on frogs of the Murray-Darling Basin and she is currently researching the ecology of the little known and threatened Sloane's Froglet, Crinia sloanei. Her social research explores how new information is incorporated in natural resource decision making. Alex has worked as a lecturer in the School of Environmental Sciences for six years.

Prior to that, Alex worked for the NSW Office of Environment in threatened species and national park management. Alex developed several environmental plans including park and fire management plans and catchment wide biodiversity management plans. Alex has worked developing and implementing collaborative programs with farmers and agencies to conserve Australian birds, mammals and frogs as well as contributing her field expertise to bioregional fauna and flora surveys in western and northern NSW. Alex also facilitates her local Landcare group which focuses on grassy box woodland restoration and community capacity building.

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  • REC205 - Open Space Planning
  • PKM562 - Environmental Policy
  • ENM422 - Environmental Impact Assessment and Audit

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Alexandra's research is focused on interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches to environmental management.  Alexandra is particularly interested in knowledge exchange and the mobilisation and utilisation of new knowledge.  Alexandra also researches Australian frogs and bats and works with community groups to ensure that new information about these species can be used to benefit them.

Current projects include:

  1. Better Parks for People.
  2. Mobilising new knowledge successfully: exploring practitioner-researchers' impacts on environmental management.
  3. Habitat management for Sloane's Froglet.
  4. Community reforestation for biodiversity, livelihood diversification and culture in Timor-Leste.
  5. Aboriginal Australians' contemporary wetland plant use and cultural attitudes to water in the Murrumbidgee Catchment.

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